Singapore to ‘Live With COVID’, Treat It as Any Other Endemic Disease, Such as Influenza

No more quarantine, expansive testing, or daily numbers

Forced to do so by the simple fact it barely has any deaths despite the fact virus is clearly present and has proven impossible to eliminate

A country that has been one of the world’s most successful at combating Covid-19 has announced it will soon fundamentally change how it manages the pandemic.

The city state of Singapore has stated covid will be treated like other endemic diseases such as flu.

There will be no goals of zero transmission. Quarantine will be dumped for travellers and close contact of cases will not have to isolate. It also plans to no longer announce daily case numbers.

But you may need to take tests to head to the shops or go to work.

Senior Singaporean ministers have said it is the “new normal” of “living with covid”.

“The bad news is that Covid-19 may never go away. The good news is that it is possible to live normally with it in our midst,” wrote Singapore’s trade Minister Gan Kim Yong, finance minister Lawrence Wong and health minister Ong Ye Kung said in an editorial in the Straits Times this week.

“It means that the virus will continue to mutate, and thereby survive in our community.”

Singapore never got to zero, now doesn’t want to

Like most countries, Singapore had an initial peak of cases last year, topping out at 600 cases a day in mid-April. Following a smaller wave in August, Covid-19 hasn’t flared up since.

However, the nation of 5.7 million, slightly larger than Sydney, has had a steady undercurrent of around 20-30 cases every day. The nation has recorded 35 deaths in total.

Singapore has strict border controls in place with most countries including tests on arrival, hotel quarantine and stay at home orders.

It’s not dissimilar to Australia, but Singapore varies the demands on travellers depending on the risk in the location where they last visited.

But all that would be eventually done away with under the plan put out by ministers Kung, Yong and Wong who make up Singapore’s Covid-19 multi-ministry task force.

“Every year, many people catch the flu. The overwhelming majority recover without needing to be hospitalised, and with little or no medication. But a minority, especially the elderly and those with comorbidities, can get very ill, and some succumb.

“We can’t eradicate it, but we can turn the pandemic into something much less threatening, like influenza or chickenpox, and get on with our lives,” the trio said.

Vaccination first, then reduce restrictions

Vaccination was key. The road map out of the current measures couldn’t begin until more people had been jabbed.

Singapore is set to have given two-thirds of its residents at least one jab within weeks and to have two-thirds fully vaccinated by early August.

Singapore has recorded some fully vaccinated locals getting Covid-19, but none of them have had serious symptoms.

The ministers state it’s likely that would continue and booster shots may be necessary.

Testing would also have to be easier and quicker. Self-administered tests, such as breathalysers, should replace the uncomfortable earbud down the back of the throat method.

Singapore’s ‘new covid normal’

The ministers said Covid-19 could be “tamed” if not vanquished.

They laid out what they called “a new normal”.

“In time, the airport, seaport, office buildings, malls, hospitals and educational institutions can use these kits to screen staff and visitors.”

People with covid would recover at home because symptoms will mostly be mild and close contacts would be vaccinated.

Because most cases will be less of an issue, the need for contact tracing and quarantining will be low.

A big change would be to no longer report daily case numbers.

“Instead of monitoring Covid-19 infection numbers every day, we will focus on the outcomes: how many fall very sick, how many in the intensive care unit, how many need to be intubated for oxygen, and so on.

“This is like how we now monitor influenza.”

The ministers wrote in the Straits Times that this would be a way for Singapore to navigate its way out of Covid-19, resume major events and travel internationally.

The Singaporean ministers said the country was by no means at a stage where the post-covid plan could commence. For the time being, current restrictions would have to remain in place.

Indeed, the country has just toughened entry to people from New South Wales due to the current Sydney outbreak.

But “a road map to transit to a new normal” was coming together.

“History has shown that every pandemic will run its course”.

Source: News.com.au


Living normally, with Covid-19: Task force ministers on how S’pore is drawing road map for new normal

by ministers Gan Kim Yong, Lawrence Wong and Ong Ye Kung

We are continuing with our efforts to control the worrisome Delta variant of Covid-19. Given its high transmissibility, it will be hard to bring infections down to zero. Instead, we are adopting an aggressive ring-fencing strategy – casting a wide net to isolate contacts of infected persons, and testing tens of thousands every day. The aim is to minimise the risk of large clusters forming.

But it has been 18 months since the pandemic started, and our people are battle-weary. All are asking: When and how will the pandemic end?

Endemic Covid-19

The bad news is that Covid-19 may never go away. The good news is that it is possible to live normally with it in our midst. This means Covid-19 will very likely become endemic. But what does that mean?

It means that the virus will continue to mutate, and thereby survive in our community. One example of such an endemic disease is influenza. Every year, many people catch the flu. The overwhelming majority recover without needing to be hospitalised, and with little or no medication. But a minority, especially the elderly and those with co-morbidities, can get very ill, and some succumb.

In a large country, the number hospitalised from influenza can be huge. For example, in the United States, hundreds of thousands are hospitalised every year because of the flu, and tens of thousands die.

But because the chances of falling very ill from influenza are so low, people live with it. They carry on with their daily activities even during the flu season, taking simple precautions or getting an annual flu jab.

We can work towards a similar outcome for Covid-19. We can’t eradicate it, but we can turn the pandemic into something much less threatening, like influenza, hand, foot and mouth disease, or chickenpox, and get on with our lives.

Doing so will be our priority in the coming months. We already have a broad plan.

Vaccination is key

First, vaccination. During his broadcast on May 31, the Prime Minister said we aimed to have two-thirds of our population take at least their first dose by early July. We are on track to achieve that target. Our next milestone will be to have at least two-thirds of our population fully vaccinated with two doses around National Day, supply permitting.

We are working to bring forward the delivery of vaccines and to speed up the process.

The evidence is clear: Vaccines are highly effective in reducing the risk of infection as well as transmission. Even if you are infected, vaccines will help prevent severe Covid-19 symptoms.

Israel’s experience shows that the infection rate among vaccinated persons is 30 times less than that of the unvaccinated. The hospitalisation rate for the vaccinated is also lower – by 10 times.

In Singapore, of the 120 plus fully vaccinated individuals who were nevertheless infected with Covid-19, including some aged above 65 – and were not resident at hospitals or nursing homes – all had either no or mild symptoms. In contrast, about 8 per cent of the unvaccinated developed serious symptoms.

To sustain a high level of protection, and to defend against new mutant strains resistant to current vaccines, booster shots may be needed in the future. We may have to sustain a comprehensive, multi-year vaccination programme.

Early evidence suggests that with vaccination, we can tame Covid-19. Again, the experience of Israel – which has vaccinated 60 per cent of its population, the highest vaccination rate in the world currently – is pertinent.

Across all age groups, the hospitalisation rate due to Covid-19 in Israel among those fully vaccinated is 0.3 per 100,000 persons daily, and the mortality rate is 0.1 per 100,000 persons.

In comparison, in 2018/19, the hospitalisation and mortality rates for influenza in the US were 0.4 and 0.03 per 100,000 persons daily, respectively. In a severe flu season, like in 2017/18, the rates were 0.67 and 0.05, respectively.

Essentially with a high rate of vaccination, Israel has brought the clinical outcomes of Covid-19 close to that of seasonal influenza in the US. These are very promising outcomes.

Testing will be easier

Second, testing and surveillance will still be needed, but the focus will be different. We would still need rigorous testing at our borders to identify any person carrying the virus, especially variants of concern.

Domestically, testing will be less of a tool for ring-fencing and quarantining people exposed to infected persons. Instead, it would be to ensure that events, social activities and overseas trips can take place safely; as well as to reduce transmission risks, especially to those who are vulnerable to infections.

We cannot rely only on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, which can be uncomfortable and takes many hours to produce results. We need to make Covid-19 testing fast and easy. We have rolled out antigen rapid tests, including self-tests, to polyclinics, private clinics, employers, premises owners and pharmacies.

There are even faster test kits in the pipeline, such as breathalysers, that take about one to two minutes to produce the results and do not involve swabbing. In time, the airport, seaport, office buildings, malls, hospitals and educational institutions can use these kits to screen staff and visitors.

There is also wastewater testing, which is useful to find out if there are hidden infections in dormitories, hostels or housing estates.

 

Treatments will improve

Third, scientists around the world are working on treatments for Covid-19. Today, we already have a range of effective treatments, which is one reason why Singapore’s Covid-19 mortality rate is among the lowest in the world.

Eighteen months after the pandemic started, we now have many therapeutic agents that are effective in treating the critically ill, quickening recovery, and reducing disease progression, severity and mortality. The Ministry of Health tracks these developments closely, ensuring that we have adequate supplies of these drugs. Our medical researchers actively participate in the development of new treatments.

Social responsibility remains critical

Finally, whether we can live with Covid-19 depends also on Singaporeans’ acceptance that Covid-19 will be endemic and our collective behaviour.

If all of us practise good personal hygiene, we are less likely to be infected. If all of us are considerate to one another, staying away from crowds when we feel unwell, we will reduce transmission. If all of us shoulder the burden together – workers keeping their colleagues safe by staying at home when ill, and employers not faulting them – our society will be so much safer.

Towards a new normal

With vaccination, testing, treatment and social responsibility, it may mean that in the near future, when someone gets Covid-19, our response can be very different from now.

The new norm can perhaps look like this:

First, an infected person can recover at home, because with vaccination the symptoms will be mostly mild. With others around the infected person also vaccinated, the risk of transmission will be low. We will worry less about the healthcare system being overwhelmed.

Second, there may not be a need to conduct massive contact tracing and quarantining of people each time we discover an infection. People can get themselves tested regularly using a variety of fast and easy tests. If positive, they can confirm with a PCR test and then isolate themselves.

Third, instead of monitoring Covid-19 infection numbers every day, we will focus on the outcomes: how many fall very sick, how many in the intensive care unit, how many need to be intubated for oxygen, and so on. This is like how we now monitor influenza.

Fourth, we can progressively ease our safe management rules and resume large gatherings as well at major events, like the National Day Parade or New Year Countdown. Businesses will have certainty that their operations will not be disrupted.

Fifth, we will be able to travel again, at least to countries that have also controlled the virus and turned it into an endemic norm. We will recognise each other’s vaccination certificates. Travellers, especially those vaccinated, can get themselves tested before departure and be exempted from quarantine with a negative test upon arrival.

We are drawing up a road map to transit to this new normal, in tandem with the achievement of our vaccination milestones, though we know the battle against Covid-19 will continue to be fraught with uncertainty.

In the meantime, we still need to take the necessary precautions and safeguards, to keep infections and hospitalisations at bay.

History has shown that every pandemic will run its course. We must harness all our energy, resources and creativity to transit as quickly as we can to the desired end-state. Science and human ingenuity will eventually prevail over Covid-19. Cohesion and social consciousness will get us there faster. We must all do our part.

Source: The Straits Times

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Ying Jun
Ying Jun
23 days ago

Ha ha! As I said, it is just another f-king flu. Most people who died are probably chain smokers, obese and/or bad air pollution. Look after your health and your immunity will do most of the work.

Jerry Hood
Jerry Hood
23 days ago

Smart leadership not an assholes like in the zionazi USrael…

Voz 0db
Voz 0db
23 days ago
Reply to  Jerry Hood

“smart leadership”.. That’s a joke right?!

Voz 0db
Voz 0db
23 days ago

Just another FRAUD & SCAM. They still pretend that PCR label “COVID-19” is some sort of a new disease when in REALITY they are just using good old PNEUMONIA and pretending it is “COVID-19″…

KTA!

ken
ken
23 days ago
Reply to  Voz 0db

Would like to add, they are using multiple diseases relabeling them as covid. Which is why the overall death rates aren’t much changed.

Dale
Dale
23 days ago

Singapore slightly less deranged than the rest of the world. Sadly, that may be something to celebrate.

ken
ken
23 days ago

“Vaccination is key”
Still pushing the kill shots.

“We have rolled out antigen rapid tests, including self-tests,…”

The antigen tests are useless as they will show antigens from a cold you had years ago. And aren’t these the tests the CDC issued a fatwa to stop using, especially if you have had the kill shots?

“History has shown that every pandemic will run its course”

Compared to pandemics prior to 2011 this joke of a pandemic would have never made pandemic status had it not been the WHO and CDC changed the requirements.

“Travellers, especially those vaccinated, can get themselves tested before departure and be exempted from quarantine with a negative test upon arrival.”

Why would you have to be tested before departure if you have taken the kill shot? (lol)
Again… the purpose of the kill shot is????

“We are drawing up a road map to transit to this new normal, in tandem with the achievement of our vaccination milestones, though we know the battle against Covid-19 will continue to be fraught with uncertainty.”

Oh,,, the double speak! Did they not just say the vaxxed had to be tested to travel?

A propaganda piece. and a pretty good one at that.

Government Defintion.jpg
Ultrafart the Brave
Ultrafart the Brave
22 days ago
Reply to  ken

“A propaganda piece. and a pretty good one at that.”

My thoughts exactly.

The narrative hasn’t actually changed.

They still want everyone to be injected with the “vaccines” that don’t stop you from catching or spreading the “bug” – but what they are actually designed to do shal never be mentioned.

And they’re dangling the juicy prospect of the “new normal” to lure everyone into bending over and taking their injection.

Never mind that the flu shots have always been voluntary (and kill way less people than the compulsory experimental Corona Chan “vaccines”). Informed consent died all those years ago with the Nuremburg Codes.

Val
Val
23 days ago

Singapore to ‘Live With COVID’, Treat It as Any Other Endemic Disease, Such as Influenza ….. WHICH IT REALLY IS! Influenza A or B is ALL they have found.

Dale
Dale
22 days ago
Reply to  Val

And they’ve never actually found those.

Ra-Horkhute
Ra-Horkhute
22 days ago

Treat CoVid-19 as another case of influenza? That’s what it has been from the beginning.

Anti-Empire