Burundi Kicks Out WHO Meddlers

Deems its national poll more important than WHO's campaign of fear

“Burundians greet each other by shaking hands and often continue holding hands for several minutes after starting a conversation. Figurative or literal references to cattle is an important part of the greetings. For example, both parties might wish each other large cattle herds, a sign of prosperity.”

Burundi has ordered the country’s top World Health Organization (WHO) representative and three other experts coordinating the coronavirus response to leave the country.

The expelled officials include the WHO’s representative Dr Walter Kazadi Mulombo, the country’s coronavirus coordinator Dr Jean Pierre Mulunda Nkata, communicable diseases head Dr Ruhana Mirindi Bisimwa, and a laboratory expert in the testing for COVID-19, Professor Daniel Tarzy.

In a letter dated May 12 and addressed to WHO’s Africa headquarters, the foreign ministry said the four officials “are declared persona non grata and as such, must leave the territory of Burundi” by Friday.

“It is the whole WHO team responsible for supporting Burundi in its response against COVID-19,” a Burundian official told AFP news agency, speaking on condition of anonymity.

“They are expelled and the health minister has totally excluded WHO, accusing it of unacceptable interference in its management of the coronavirus.”

The letter does not provide a reason for the decision. Diplomatic and administrative sources told AFP that the foreign ministry aborted a similar attempt to expel the same four officials a month ago.

The Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention has described the move as “unfortunate” at a time when greater cooperation was needed to tackle the virus on the continent.

“We are in dire need of technical expertise as a continent, which has a very weak health system and fragile infrastructure, where we don’t have the luxury of kicking out WHO,” Africa CDC director John Nkengasong told reporters on Thursday.

The announcement comes just days before Burundians go to the polls on May 20 to choose a new president, parliamentarians and local officials.

The landlocked country of some 11 million has officially recorded 27 cases and one death from coronavirus.

But it has taken few precautions against the disease and testing is low, fuelling concern that the true extent of the outbreak is not known.

Source: Al Jazeera

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kpevt12 .
kpevt12 .
1 month ago

Time to send in some CIA ISIS Terrorists and then bomb the hell out of Burundi claiming it is to fight ISIS terrorists sent in by the empire. Not following the empire narrative usually leads to some sort of invasion.

Terje M
1 month ago

When looking at mortality and causes of death for Burundi, I notice the health statistics are routinely weighting younger deaths more than older deaths, i.e premature mortality, where the life of a 15-year old would weigh heavier than someone 84 (not many in Burundi anyway).

One might ask why this isn’t routinely do with covid-statistics in the rest of the world? The answer it of course that it would make the severity of covid insignificant.

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:9IdZPvPrGCQJ:www.healthdata.org/sites/default/files/files/country_profiles/GBD/ihme_gbd_country_report_burundi.pdf+&cd=2&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=au

dynosawer
dynosawer
1 month ago

Well done! The lack of testing means that they’re not confused by the totally subjective results from tests which have yet be valid. If they want high numbers, just count everything as covid the way Western countries are doing.

Marko Marjanović
1 month ago
Reply to  dynosawer

Tests even imperfect ones would be great if people were rational and able to comprehend things in context but the way it is they only serve to spoke them. If overall mortality isn’t out of the ordinary then what’s the problem?

itchyvet
itchyvet
1 month ago

Kudos to the Burundians.

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